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Welcome to the 2021 Culture of Data Conference!
April 8-9, 2021
Colorado Public Health Association

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Thursday, April 8
 

11:30am MDT

Opening Remarks/Keynote with Johnnie "Chip" Allen and the Colorado Health Foundation
Opening Remarks/Keynote

A Culture of Health Equity: Are We Ready? What Does the Data Tell Us?
Speaker: Johnnie "Chip" Allen

Achieving a culture of health equity requires the strategic use of data. However, public health data is not always used to its full potential. This presentation will outline how available data can be used to equitably respond to public health challenges like chronic disease inequities,COVID-19 and the political determinants of health.

Taking the Pulse of Coloradans: Insights from a Poll of 2.275 Respondents presented by the Colorado Health Foundation

The Colorado Health Foundation Poll is an unvarnished look at the worries, priorities and experiences of Coloradans. Launched in September 2020, Pulse interviewed 2,275 Coloradans to understand their thoughts and opinions on health care, affordable housing, mental health, racial injustice, COVID-19, and much more. At this session, we'll talk together about the results of the inaugural Pulse poll, consider how public opinion data can be useful to the field of public health, and discuss how to strengthen the survey in coming years.    Through Pulse, we know more about what’s keeping people up at night, what’s dominating their dinner table conversations, or what they think needs to happen to make the state a better place. More than 1 in 5 Coloradans are worried they might lose their home because they can't pay. A majority of Coloradans report increased mental health strain, such as anxiety, loneliness or stress, as a result of COVID-19. Over 40% of Black Coloradans have felt afraid of the police in the last year. These are just a few of the results that have gotten policymakers, journalists and civically engaged Coloradans talking.    Pulse was conducted by a bipartisan pollster team. Using an address-based sample, respondents were contacted through email, text, mail and phone on both cell phones and landlines. The large sample size of Pulse allows for significant analysis of sub-groups such as Black Coloradans, Hispanic respondents, households with low incomes, and more. The full dataset is publicly available for download as part of our commitment to transparency, and an interactive Tableau dashboard makes the results accessible for anyone. Pulse: The Colorado Health Foundation Poll is an annual survey and will be conducted again in 2021. Session participants will have the opportunity to weigh in on what topics they'd like to see explored in the 2021 poll.

Speakers
avatar for Johnnie

Johnnie "Chip" Allen

Bio - Mr. Allen is a public health expert with over 13 years of experience in addressing health equity issues at the local, state, and national levels. He works in partnership with local communities, governmental agencies, and academic institutions to develop strategies, policies... Read More →
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Kyle Rojas Legleiter

The Colorado Health Foundation
Kyle’s work in policy always starts with people. His first experiences in public health were as an undergraduate, where he volunteered with a group of campus student health educators who provided rape crisis counseling and sexual assault prevention education. Since then, he has... Read More →
avatar for Austin Montoya

Austin Montoya

Communications Officer, The Colorado Health Foundation
Advocacy runs in Austin’s veins. It started in college, where he was the President of Students United for Reproductive Justice, a student leadership organization created by Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains. Through that experience, Austin realized his passion for health... Read More →
avatar for Jace Woodrum

Jace Woodrum

Senior Officer, Public Opinion Insights, The Colorado Health Foundation
Jace is an advocate for social justice with a focus on public opinion, messaging, and communications strategy. He currently works at The Colorado Health Foundation, where he advances health equity policy through Pulse: The Colorado Health Foundation Poll and other research projects.Previously... Read More →

Sponsors

Thursday April 8, 2021 11:30am - 12:50pm MDT

1:00pm MDT

A1 Breakout Session: What We Can Learn from COVID Data About Colorado Communities
This session includes two presentations showcasing what COVID data can tell us about Colorado communities.
  • Presentation 1: Distancing, Disease, Data, and Disparity: What the Social Distancing Index Reveals About Inequity in Colorado (Jasmine Bains; Colorado Health Institute)
  • Presentation 2: Beyond COVID-19 Incidence Rates: Measuring the Impact of Covid-19 on Communities (Gabriela Reyes, Robyn Harte, Adam Anderson; Tri-County Health Department)

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Full presentation descriptions:
Distancing, Disease, Data, and Disparity: What the Social Distancing Index Reveals About Inequity in Colorado
Social distancing, such as avoiding crowds and maintaining a six-foot distance from others, is strongly recommended by public health officials to reduce the transmission of COVID-19.    

But social distancing is harder to practice for people who live some neighborhoods and towns than others. Conditions such as high rates of crowded housing or low-wage, hands-on work make it easier for viruses to spread. For example, despite the wide-open spaces on the Eastern Plains, people living in these rural communities have crowded living quarters and higher rates of jobs that require workers to be physically present. Census tracts where more people of color live and those where incomes are lower than average also have higher rates of conditions that are not favorable to social distancing.    

This presentation will explore how the Colorado Health Institute used American Community Survey five-year estimates, including measures of overcrowded homes, population density, and working in an essential job, to illuminate social inequities that impact Coloradans. These data were used to build a Social Distancing Index to pinpoint areas of the state where residents are likely to have a harder time following public health advice to avoid interacting with others. The index is displayed as an interactive mapping feature for users.     

Session attendees will benefit from this presentation by learning how data can be used to identify areas of social inequity. They will also learn how indices like the Social Distancing Index can be useful as state and local leaders prepare for the next phase of their campaign against COVID-19 and future public health efforts.   

Beyond COVID-19 Incidence Rates: Measuring the Impact of Covid-19 on Communities
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has unveiled disparities infection rates, hospitalizations, and death across communities in the Tri-County Health Department (TCHD) jurisdiction (Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Counties). In addition to the health effects, there have been significant disparities in the economic and educational consequences of COVID-19. TCHD assessed indicators around the COVID-19 health, economic, and educational outcomes at the neighborhood level to begin to describe the disparities in communities that have been disproportionately impacted.    

TCHD uses COVID-19 case investigation data, along with multiple datasets (including census, labor statistics, education statistics) to describe community characteristics, demographics, and geographic factors. TCHD compiles these data within GIS, and using a decile classification, identifies the census tracts with the highest 10% COVID-19 incidence rates and the lowest 10% COVID-19 incidence rates. TCHD compares community attributes between the identified census tracts to compare and contrast neighborhoods that have suffered a disproportionate burden of these impacts to those neighborhoods that have been least impacted.   

Speakers
avatar for Adam Anderson

Adam Anderson

Tri-County Health Department
Mr. Anderson is currently a Population Health Epidemiologist at Tri-County Health Department. He specializes in understanding and measuring how communities, cultures, and the physical environment we live in can influence health outcomes and behaviors. Previous to Tri-County Health... Read More →
avatar for Gabriela Reyes

Gabriela Reyes

Data Science/Epidemiologist, Tri-County Health Department
Gabriela Reyes, MPH is a Population Health Epidemiologist at Tri-County Health Department (TCHD). She specializes in data collection and visualization focused on identifying populations in need to assist with programs internally and externally. She interprets population data using... Read More →
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Robyn Harte

Tri-County Health Department
avatar for Jasmine Bains

Jasmine Bains

Research Analyst, Colorado Health Institute
Jasmine Bains joined the Colorado Health Institute (CHI) in July 2019 as a research analyst. At CHI, she specializes in program evaluation, data analysis and visualization, and supporting the Metro Denver Partnership for Health cross-sector collaborative. Her most recent work includes... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Trailhead Institute

Trailhead Institute

CEO, Trailhead Institute
Trailhead is a public health institute that serves as a basecamp for Colorado’s public health sector, working with and for all Coloradans through their communities and networks. Because health begins where we live, work, learn and play, Trailhead provides partnership and administrative... Read More →


Thursday April 8, 2021 1:00pm - 2:15pm MDT

1:00pm MDT

A2 Breakout Session: Behavioral Health Data
This session includes two presentations about how data is used to identify and respond to behavioral health challenges.
  • Presentation 1: Root Causes: A Statistical Journey into Social and Economic Factors Influencing Mental Health (Lindsey Whittington, Emily Johnson; Colorado Health Institute)
  • Presentation 2: A Community's Data Response to Current and Emerging Drug Threats (Anne Hill, Ryan Turner, Jenny Case; Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment)
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Full presentation descriptions:
Root Causes: A Statistical Journey into Social and Economic Factors Influencing Mental Health
The Colorado Health Institute (CHI), in partnership with The Colorado Health Foundation, has developed the Root Causes project, a three-phase initiative that created multiple interactive tools allowing users to explore and understand the impact of specific economic, social, and environmental factors on mental health in their local communities. Together, these tools can help policymakers, community leaders, foundations, local agencies, researchers, and others understand what factors are associated with mental health outcomes and how these factors have changed over time at the local level. These tools help identify areas in Colorado that may be experiencing disparities in health, social, and economic outcomes and quantify the contributions these factors have on mental health.    

During the first two phases of work, CHI created a mapping tool that brings together data from multiple sources into one place – providing the user with a “one-stop shop” for data on economic, social, and environmental factors that influence mental health in Colorado. The tool also provided users with landing pages dedicated to county-level perspectives that helped further explore correlations of these indicators with mental health. CHI also engaged with community members to highlight stories of how these factors have changed in their communities and how these changes may have influenced mental health over time.     

In the final phase, CHI adapted a model that quantifies the impact of factors that directly influence mental health and, if improved, show attainable changes in mental health both state-wide and regionally. This model is a creative and innovative approach in discerning possible policy or programmatic solutions that could lead to real improvements.     

The presentation will highlight all phases of this innovative work. It will walk attendees through each one to demonstrate the creative ways that data can be used to understand mental health in local communities in Colorado.   


A Community's Data Response to Current and Emerging Drug Threats 
The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment (PDPHE) received a grant from the Department of Justice (DOJ) in September 2019 to collect organizational-related data on current and emerging drug threats and collectively respond to these threats in Pueblo County. Beginning in November 2019, PDPHE convened existing and new community partners from different sectors (safety, health, harm reduction, schools/child well-being) as well as broad representation from agencies including data analysts to leadership to: 1) determine project-based research questions; 2) select a data management software system; 3) identify critical drug-related measures; 4) visualize data publicly; and 5) respond to drug-related threats using data.   Partners were critical in determining research questions aimed to: 1) understand current and emerging drug threats; 2) learn from drug-related issues partner agencies were encountering; and 3) determine mitigation of drug threats as well as provide input in brainstorming sessions on critical components when choosing a data management software system such as necessary basic features, software requirements, security, installation, and training. Additionally, partners selected drug-related measures to collect based on the significance/value of the data, feasibility of collection, consistency across sectors, and regularity of data collection. Efforts were made to incorporate health equity principles in the data collection process including area of residence, gender, age, and race/ethnicity.  Regular data collection began in April 2020 after partners signed data agreements. PDPHE aggregated data and with guidance from community partners, constructed internal dashboards using the data software system, Tableau. The visuals provided a comprehensive understanding and visual representation of drug-related arrests, overdose calls, deaths, naloxone distribution, and health-related services as well as offered partners accessibility and insight into the data using a more hands-on interactive approach. Internal dashboard views were reviewed by partners over three months with the goal of creating a public dashboard for display by January 2021. 

Speakers
JC

Jenny Case

Public Health Planner, Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment
As a Public Health Planner with the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment, Jenny is responsible for facilitating several collaborative efforts within the Department and Pueblo County such as performance management, community health assessment/community health improvement... Read More →
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Ryan Turner

Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment
avatar for Anne Hill

Anne Hill

Public Health Epidemiologist, Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment
avatar for Lindsey Whittington

Lindsey Whittington

Research Analyst, Colorado Health Institute
Lindsey Whittington joined the Colorado Health Institute in November 2019. Lindsey’s work includes quantitative research analysis of public health surveillance systems and creating data visualizations. Before coming to CHI, Lindsey worked at Tri-County Health Department where she... Read More →


Thursday April 8, 2021 1:00pm - 2:15pm MDT

2:15pm MDT

Walk-and-Learn 1: Using a Health Equity Lens with Community Health Data: Principles to Practice
This is a 20-minute, audio-only session. Listen in to learn some content while you take a break from the computer screen and take a walk around the block.

Using a Health Equity Lens with Community Health Data: Principles to Practice 
Ellen Sublett, Sara Yousuf, Claire Peters; Children's Hospital Colorado

Data can be a powerful tool and critical to making decisions in all aspects of life. Given this inherent power, there are several potential negative consequences to how data are used that reinforce systemic inequities rather than reducing them. This presentation will focused on equitable approaches to community health data, focusing in two areas: 1) equity principles in collection, analysis, and communication of community health data, and 2)  how Children’s is testing these principles with their community health needs assessment (CHNA) work in the spring of 2021, including what is going well and opportunities for continued learning in how to put data equity practices to work. Part one of the presentation will provide attendees with specific steps, examples, scenarios of equitable approaches with connections to health equity concepts such as bias, power and privilege and intersectionality, as well as resources to continue learning in data equity. Part two of the presentation will provide attendees with a real-life example of how these principles are working in practice at Children’s as they conduct their 2021 CHNAs, giving attendees ideas for ways to apply these practices to their work.

Speakers
avatar for Claire Peters

Claire Peters

Epidemiologist, Children's Hospital Colorado
Claire leads a data analytics and quality improvement team focused on community health and social determinants of health for patients and families seen at Children's and in the surrounding community. She provides analytic support to the hospital’s population health team to evaluate... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Cruze

Ellen Cruze

Quality Improvement Specialist and Data Analyst, Children's Hospital Colorado
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Sana Yousuf

Children's Hospital Colorado


Thursday April 8, 2021 2:15pm - 2:45pm MDT

2:45pm MDT

B1 Breakout Session: How the Pandemic is Impacting Public and Behavioral Health Indicators
This session includes two presentations about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting many areas of life and the impacts that are emerging in surveillance and survey data.
  • Presentation 1: Health Inequities and the Impact of COVID-19 Among Colorado’s Young People – Results from the 2020 HKCS Supplement (Whitney Israel - Colorado School of Public Health Anschutz Medical Campus; Emily Fine - Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment)
  • Presentation 2: Utilizing a State Epidemiology Workgroup to Generate a Behavioral Health COVID Impacts Report (Stacey McClellan, Julia Ricotta, Charlotte Gray; OMNI Institute)
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Full presentation descriptions:
Health Inequities and the Impact of COVID-19 Among Colorado’s Young People – Results from the 2020 HKCS Supplement
The purpose of this session is to share youth health outcomes and behaviors from the 2020 Healthy Kids Colorado Survey (HKCS) Supplement, specifically identifying health disparities among young people, contextualizing the disparities using an equity lens, and highlighting the collaborative effort of the Colorado School of Public Health (CSPH), Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and local school communities.     

In the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, the CSPH School & Youth Survey team administered the 2020 HKCS Supplement to measure adolescent health outcomes across Colorado. The survey was a shortened version of the standard HKCS, which is aligned with the CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey and administered in odd-numbered years. The last full HKCS was administered in the fall of 2019 to over 100,000 middle and high school students.     

The 2020 HKCS Supplement was administered from October through December with the purpose of collecting critical data to evaluate the effects of COVID-19 and other relevant and timely health indicators such as experiences with racism & discrimination, ACEs, and resilience. In addition to these new measures, the instrument retained alignment with core measures in the 2019 HKCS for comparative analysis (e.g., mental health, substance use, school connectedness).    

The 2020 HKCS Supplement was offered to all participating schools of the 2019 HKCS (n=503). This convenience sampling resulted in approximately 73 schools enrolling in the survey.     We hope that this study will provide all participants with takeaways about the current state of health for young people in Colorado, with an emphasis on framing the data to understand systemic inequities experienced by Colorado youth during the COVID-19 pandemic.   


Utilizing a State Epidemiology Workgroup to Generate a Behavioral Health COVID Impacts Report
COVID-19 has affected community members' health and wellness beyond the coronavirus virus itself, and health data sources are slowly beginning to show these effects. This presentation will focus on the development of a state level COVID Impact report utilizing non-traditional, multidisciplinary data sources to illustrate the impact of COVID-19. It will also cover the process of using a statewide epidemiological outcome workgroup (SEOW) to access and understand this cross-sector data.   

The COVID Impact report includes preliminary trends in data around behavioral health, substance use and overdoses, the criminal justice system, and adverse childhood experiences since the onset of COVID in March 2020. Each topic covers data changes throughout the pandemic, how these changes compare to previous years of data, and how the state is addressing these impacts through program adaptations and innovative initiatives or programs. In addition to the behavioral health data, our team gathered other valuable resources to support the report, such as state legislation changes and the timeline of COVID-related restrictions, to create a holistic picture of each topic area.  

The presentation will also address some challenges our team faced when collecting data. As we gathered data, many traditional data or commonly used sources were not available for our focus areas. Our team had to look beyond traditional sources to converge on some indicators of interest. For example, in the absence of current local data on substance use rates, we looked at alcohol sales from the Alcoholic Beverage Control authority, alcohol-related crashes (State Patrol), hospitalizations, and death certificate data (Department of Health) to paint a picture of substance use during COVID-19. The lag in availability of traditional public health data sources has forced our team to take more creative approaches that have shifted our perspective as researchers and opened up new reporting opportunities.


Speakers
EF

Emily Fine

School and Youth Survey Manager, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
Emily Fine works as the School and Youth Survey Manager at the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE). In this role, Emily manages the state's unified approach to school and youth health surveys to support the health and well-being of young people. She enjoys working... Read More →
avatar for Stacey McClellan

Stacey McClellan

Research, OMNI Institute
Stacey McClellan joined OMNI as a Researcher focusing on Public Health in July 2019, providing evaluation support to substance use treatment programs. Since then, her focus has expanded to include evaluation support within the Criminal Justice field, including juvenile justice diversion... Read More →
avatar for Julia Ricotta

Julia Ricotta

Researcher, OMNI Institute
Julia Ricotta, MPH, is a Researcher at OMNI Institute. She primarily focuses on substance use disorder treatment and recovery, and has worked with several treatment centers on evaluation outcomes planning. Julia is passionate about partnering with communities to promote health equity... Read More →
avatar for Charlotte Gray

Charlotte Gray

Research Associate II, OMNI Institute
I am a Research Associate II at the OMNI Institute. I support multiple evaluation projects, with the majority focused on substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery. I received my MPH from Northeastern University in Boston and am passionate (to name a few) about public health... Read More →
avatar for Whitney Israel

Whitney Israel

Systems & Operations Manager, Colorado School of Public Health - Anschutz Medical Campus
Whitney Israel is the Operations Manager for the School and Youth Survey Team at the Colorado School of Public Health. Whitney leads the Systems and Operations Core in school and youth survey methodology, development, and administration. Whitney obtained her Master in Public Health... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Trailhead Institute

Trailhead Institute

CEO, Trailhead Institute
Trailhead is a public health institute that serves as a basecamp for Colorado’s public health sector, working with and for all Coloradans through their communities and networks. Because health begins where we live, work, learn and play, Trailhead provides partnership and administrative... Read More →


Thursday April 8, 2021 2:45pm - 4:00pm MDT

2:45pm MDT

B2 Breakout Session: Examining Inequities in Maternal and Child Health
This session includes two presentations that examine current inequities and potential solutions to make maternal and child care more equitable.
  • Presentation 1: Diverse Colorado Voices: Community-based Solutions for the Perinatal Period: Feedback from 5 Statewide Listening Sessions with Community Members and Birth Equity Leaders in Colorado (Kayla Frawley, Holley Murphy - Clayton Early Learning; Lynn VanderWielen - End Grain Research & Evaluation LLC // Families Forward Resource Center)
  • Presentation 2: Ethnic Disparities in the Care of Opioid Exposed Newborns in Colorado Birthing Hospitals (Blair Weikel, Mauricio Palau - University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Pediatrics; Sunah Hwang - University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Colorado Section of Neonatology)
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Full presentation descriptions:
Diverse Colorado Voices: Community-based Solutions for the Perinatal Period: Feedback from 5 Statewide Listening Sessions with Community Members and Birth Equity Leaders in Colorado
The authentic and intentional incorporation of community voice and lived experiences  into policy, practice, and programing has the profound potential to optimize equitable  health outcomes for those in the perinatal period. Through cross-collaborating with grass roots - perinatal birth equity leaders in the state of Colorado we held 5 listening sessions to seek community defined issues and solutions in the perinatal time period in Colorado. Data gathered during community member listening sessions identified three overarching issues faced in the perinatal period: systemic racism, lack of postpartum support, and systems-level inadequacies.  Policy implementations and recommendations to optimize perinatal care were drawn  from community member input, and emphasize the need to examine issues  as interconnected and inextricably linked to the social determinants of health.    

In July 2020 the Maternal Mortality Review Committee released their report titled Maternal Mortality in Colorado, 2014 - 2016 which examines all cases of maternal death. The committee described one of the next steps in the process as identifying community-led solutions to maternal mortality. The report acknowledges that “grassroots community-based perinatal and birth providers and activists all play a unique and necessary role and will be a part of community-led solutions.”     

Critically, all policies should be viewed through an anti-racist lens such that Colorado  strives to attain health equity for all. Implementation, design, and development  of these recommendations need to be done with the consultation of the lived expertise  of families that experience challenges like those associated with experienced racism. Participants will be given the example of community engagement of listening sessions, including the importance of highlighting local community leaders in the perinatal period, opportunities for aligning advocacy efforts and tangible policy recommendations that are community driven, anti-racist, and address micro and macro systems level inadequacies in the perinatal time period.   


Ethnic Disparities in the Care of Opioid Exposed Newborns in Colorado Birthing Hospitals 
This presentation explores the disparity in quality improvement outcomes among Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic opioid exposed newborns within a statewide collaborative. Data were collected for this initiative directly from hospitals at the mother-infant dyad level. This study found that while pre and post intervention numbers reflected positive outcomes among both groups, when we disaggregated data by maternal Hispanic ethnicity and tracked it over time, the path to these outcomes was not uniform. We discovered that the Hispanic cohort experienced one to three quarter delays in sustained improvement as compared to their Non-Hispanic counterparts, indicating some difference in how they experienced the interventions and process of the improvement efforts. We hypothesize that language barriers as well as compounding socioeconomic characteristics of Hispanic families in our state likely accounted for some of this difference. Previous research has explored the experience of pediatric parents with limited English proficiency and has found increased risk of parents misunderstanding their child’s diagnosis, inadequate use of required interpretation tools even when indicated as necessary, and fear of being a burden on providers. While we believe language barriers were likely a factor in our study, we discovered in the analysis process that many of our participants did not have a documented primary or preferred language recorded in our dataset which was based on electronic health record (EHR) data. Studies exploring the accuracy of sociodemographic data captured in electronic health records have found that when compared to self-report, the EHR underestimates Hispanic ethnicity, primary Spanish language speaking, and bi-/multi-race status. The results of this study and others indicate a need for QI efforts that explicitly focus on culturally competent approaches for the outset for mother and infants.

Speakers
avatar for Kayla Frawley

Kayla Frawley

Manager of Policy and Advocacy, Clayton Early Learning
Kayla Frawley is the Manager of Policy & Advocacy at Clayton Early Learning, co-convenes the Raise Colorado Coalition, and manages the Parent Ambassador Program - bridging parent leadership and state policy. She is a former Maternal-Child Health Educator at Denver Health, a former... Read More →
avatar for Holley Murphy, MA

Holley Murphy, MA

Research Associate/Policy Analyst, Clayton Early Learning
Holley Murphy, M.A., is a bilingual Research Associate and part time Policy Analyst at Clayton Early Learning. Driven by health and education equity, she has focused her career at Clayton in finding ways to influence change for people who are systematically marginalized. The development... Read More →
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Lynn VanderWielen, MPH, PhD

End Grain Research & Evaluation LLC // Families Forward Resource Center
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Blair W Weikel

Research Instructor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
MA

Mauricio A Palau

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Pediatrics
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Sunah S Hwang

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Colorado Section of Neonatology


Thursday April 8, 2021 2:45pm - 4:00pm MDT
 
Friday, April 9
 

9:00am MDT

Plenary: No Connection: Building a Virtual Workforce to Collect Data on the Navajo Reservation during COVID-19
Plenary

No Connection: Building a Virtual Workforce to Collect Data on the Navajo Reservation during COVID-19
Speaker: Ashleigh Manuelito

Overview: The Navajo Nation spans over 27,000 square miles and is home to over 298,000 enrolled members. During COVID-19, the Navajo Nation experienced one of the highest COVID rates in the world. In collaboration with many health programs and tribal leaders, Community Outreach Programming Engagement (COPE) spearheaded a virtual workforce in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. Through combined efforts of many community members, COPE has been able to successfully measure the spread of the virus and ensure social support for affected families and communities. It is through these connections that allowed us to foster strong relationships within the communities where we work, enabling us to effectively mobilize high-impact programs and mitigate the impact of COVID-19.

Speakers
AM

Ashleigh Manuelito

Contact Tracer Supervisor, COPE Program
Ashleigh was born and raised in Flagstaff, Arizona. She is a proud member of the Navajo Nation. She holds a B.A. in Human Biology with a concentration of Neurobiology and Philosophy of Mind from Stanford University. She is currently a Masters of Public Health student at the University... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for CORHIO

CORHIO

CORHIO


Friday April 9, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am MDT

10:15am MDT

C1 Breakout Session: Storytelling with Data
This session includes two presentations that demonstrate the use of storytelling to address health equity.
  • Presentation 1: Highlighting Inequity through Digital Storytelling (Adam Soberay, Francis Cheung - Aurora Research Institute; Jan Jenkins - Colorado Refugee Wellness Center)
  • Presentation 2: Colorado Equity Compass: How to Use a Data Storytelling Platform to Advance Health Equity (Annie VanDan - Change Matrix; Julie Ramirez - RISE Southeast Coalition; Jennifer Newcomer - Colorado Futures Center)
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Full presentation descriptions:
Highlighting Inequity through Digital Storytelling
Historically, due to language and cultural barriers, data collection has been a challenge in refugee and immigrant populations. These barriers were further highlighted by the recent COVID-19 pandemic. The Aurora Research Institute has partnered with the Colorado Refugee Wellness Center to evaluate a program that seeks to reduce employment related barriers as a means to address health disparities in refugee and immigrant populations. The project team has partnered with several city and state partners in Colorado with the goal of changing employment related policy to improve job opportunities for refugees and immigrants. In this presentation the speaker will highlight some challenges in the transition to a virtual data collection platform and share some best practice tools to reduce technology barriers for better data collection. Additionally, we have learned in past research that many refugee and immigrant populations respond better to qualitative methods of data collection. For this project the evaluators used a digital story telling method to allow participants to provide data in the form of storytelling on their experience with the project. Following these digital stories, the evaluators created a video as part of the final report. Participants will learn more about digital story-telling and how to incorporate this method into data collection efforts.   
*Participants will be invited to share their experience as part of this presentation. (This aspect of the presentation will depend on participant interested and availability). 


Colorado Equity Compass: How to Use a Data Storytelling Platform to Advance Health Equity
The Colorado Equity Compass Collaborative, comprised of The Colorado Trust, Shift Research Lab, and Change Matrix, was formed in 2019 to address social determinants of health in Colorado’s communities. The Collaborative has developed an open data platform of Colorado-focused, community-level health equity indicators that brings to life the experiences of residents in communities experiencing inequities. Four Colorado communities have been engaged as pilot sites to provide input and direction for the platform. In this presentation, learn how each site is engaging their community to determine the focus areas for their data (e.g. housing affordability, food access, life expectancy). Hear how the communities including Southeast Colorado Springs and Denver's Colfax Neighborhood are identifying the best practices for data collection, data governance and data sharing.

Speakers
avatar for Annie VanDan

Annie VanDan

Change Specialist, Change Matrix
I am excited to be presenting about the Colorado Equity Compass (www.coequitycompass.org), a platform that provides communities and organizations across the state with the data and stories they need to improve health equity. My background is in strategic communications, leadership... Read More →
avatar for Adam Soberay

Adam Soberay

Research Associate, Aurora Research Institute
For the past six years, I have been a research associate with the Aurora Research Institute. During that time, I have been a lead evaluator for a variety of programs across multiple community-based agencies; including the Aurora Mental Health Center, the Colorado Refugee Wellness... Read More →
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Francis Cheung

Jr. Research Associate, Aurora Research Institute
avatar for Julie Ramirez

Julie Ramirez

Producer of Daily Dose 719, RISE | Southeast
After graduating from MSU Denver, Julie felt the need to give back to her community, Southeast Colorado Springs. She joined the Local Planning Team and Grant review committee for the state funded grant program Transforming Safety and helped decide how $1.3 million would be spent in... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for OMNI Institute

OMNI Institute

VP, OMNI Institute
At the OMNI Institute, we believe data have the ability to inspire, activate, and galvanize individuals and organizations to change their world. As a 501c(3) non-profit social science consultancy, we partner with those working to solve our communities’ most complex issues, driven... Read More →


Friday April 9, 2021 10:15am - 11:30am MDT

10:15am MDT

C2 Breakout Session: Skill-Building Session - Community Planning with Census Data
Community Planning with Census Data

Do you need to understand your community or wonder how to plan for the needs of people around you? During this skill learning session, participants will learn about the most current and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and housing statistics for thier community. We will explore the resources of data, what geographic levels and how frequently data is released, why there are so many data and how to access them for free! You will learn how to search and use navigation features on census.gov, as well as how to download tables and create thematic maps for understanding and planning in your community.

Speakers
KD

Kimberly Davis

U.S. Census Bureau

Sponsors
avatar for OMNI Institute

OMNI Institute

VP, OMNI Institute
At the OMNI Institute, we believe data have the ability to inspire, activate, and galvanize individuals and organizations to change their world. As a 501c(3) non-profit social science consultancy, we partner with those working to solve our communities’ most complex issues, driven... Read More →


Friday April 9, 2021 10:15am - 11:30am MDT

11:30am MDT

Walk-and-Learn 2: Choosing Priority Populations for Tobacco Control in Colorado, 2019
This is a 20-minute, audio-only session. Listen in to learn some content while you take a break from the computer screen and take a walk around the block.

Choosing Priority Populations for Tobacco Control in Colorado, 2021
Francesca Macaluso, Katherine James, Arnold Levinson - University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health

The identification of priority populations for public health intervention follows varied processes across public health, healthcare services, and research domains. Making the process explicit and consistent in principle will allow for better collaboration among partners seeking to engage in reducing health disparities, including public health professionals and community organizations. Since 2004, the Community Epidemiology Program & Evaluation Group (CEPEG) at the University of Colorado | Anschutz Medical Campus has periodically identified priority populations for tobacco use interventions, using data from The Attitudes and Behaviors Survey (TABS) on Health, a population-based survey of Colorado adults. Criteria for priority-setting have included social justice, elevated burden rates, greatest number of smokers, and workplace settings. In the past, each criterion was applied alone. CEPEG currently proposes that these and additional criteria should be applied jointly in a sequence, starting with two threshold criteria: social equity, and disparately high prevalence of a burden. Other criteria include population size, accessibility, shared sense of community, and potential partners. Priority designations inevitably lie along a size-burden continuum, where decision-makers must balance resources between more burdened but smaller population groups and less burdened but larger population groups. This presentation addresses the development of a consistent approach to priority population designation and identifies opportunities for information and resource sharing among various sectors of the public health workforce.

Speakers
avatar for Francesca Macaluso

Francesca Macaluso

Professional Research Assistant, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health
Francesca Macaluso is a Professional Research Assistant and DrPH student at the University of Colorado's Anschutz Medical Campus in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health. Prior to moving to Denver, she attended Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia where she obtained... Read More →
KA

Katherine A. James

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health
AH

Arnold H. Levinson

Professor, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health


Friday April 9, 2021 11:30am - 12:00pm MDT
 
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